5 Tips for Boy Scout Parents

Many parents who are extremely excited about enrolling their children to the Cub Scouts often become less enthusiastic as the years go by and they become less supportive of their kids. While there will come a time when they will truly need to learn to be independent in handling their various activities in the den, it is still very important for parents to remain consistently supportive. Otherwise, the child may simply lose interest in this endeavor.

Boy scouting is a worthwhile activity for many children – it gives them a sense of achievement and it keeps them busy from various unfavorable habits, helping them make ethical and moral choices. However, without the guidance of parents, kids may have trouble furthering themselves as scouts. Here are some things that every parent should know in order to help their kid attain the highest scout rank:

Boy scouting requires financial commitment from parents. Expenses on requirements, such as uniforms, handbooks, registration fees, regular dues, and activity fees, often spring up on a yearly or month basis. However despite all this, as a parent, you can rest assured that your money is invested on the well-being of your child.
The role of the parents is very crucial especially during the earlier stage of scouting. As a cub scout, the child would still need his parents to actively participate in activities designed for both parent and child, and to attend in meetings set for all parents or guardians.
As the child advances to higher ranks, he would require less adult supervision. However, it would still matter a lot if a parent regularly asks the child about how his scouting career is going. Being supportive about your child’s activities can make him feel more encouraged about what he is doing. Offer guidance and assistance once in a while but avoid violating his aim to become more independent.
There are certain events, particularly pack activities, which may require parents to participate. These occurrences do not come too often so it wouldn’t hurt to keep yourself posted on these dates and take them as bonding experiences for you and your kid.
If you’re interested in becoming an adult volunteer, you may be required to take the adult protection training. This can help you understand the scouting career better and train parents to identify and report possibilities of abuse. It requires the parent to renew the training every two years and a certificate of completion will be awarded to successful participants.